Summary - (Duration: 1m 00s, Size: 4.6Mb)

The Secwepemc, like all other First Nations, understand the Creator is the originator of all life, animals, fish, birds, trees, plants, and us as humans. We know that we are no greater or no less than all other living creatures of the world. We recognize that we are a very small part of the universe blessed by the Creator to play a very sacred role in this world and to care for Mother Earth.

Fish Spear Making

Secwepemc Worldview

Summary - (Duration: 3m 26s, Size: 16.4Mb)

Dr. Mary Thomas was a Neskonlith community member well-known and respected for her work at preserving Secwepemc language and culture. In this video, she shows the process of tanning a hide. Before European contact, most clothing was produced from tanned animal hides.

Secwepemc Boundary Story by Audrey Eugene

Summer Home Materials

Making Moccasins

Saskatoon Berries

Summary - (Duration: 5m 52s, Size: 28.3Mb)

Louis Matthew was a Simpcw community member well-known and respected for his work at preserving Secwepemc language and culture. In this video, he is recorded when making a fish spear. The Secwepemc people make and use fish spears for salmon fishing along the Fraser River.

Summary - (Duration: 2m 32s, Size: 12.7Mb)

This video explains that Saskatoon berries were always the first ready berries of the season and were a special treat for everyone. The Secwepemc Elders told stories how people celebrated this season where the Chief of each tribe would announce the beginning of Saskatoon berry picking. Enough berries would be preserved to make sure that everyone in the community would be taken care of during the long winter months.

Summary - (Duration: 7m 20s, Size: 33.6Mb)

In this video, Neskonlith community member Susan August explains the process of smoking salmon. Secwepemc people always preserved salmon this way before electricity was introduced to the community. In order to get ready for the long winter months, the gathering and preservation of food started in the Spring time and continued throughout the season to the Fall time. 

Smoking Salmon

Summary - (Duration: 3m 36s, Size: 16.1Mb)

Dr. Mary Thomas was a Neskonlith community member well-known and respected for her work at preserving Secwepemc language and culture. In this video, Dr. Thomas speaks about usage and how to take care of a winter home. Winter home villages were located by main waterways and generally housed up to two families.

1910 Declaration

Tanning a Hide

Summary - (Duration: 2m 25s, Size: 10.2Mb)

Dr. Mary Thomas was a Neskonlith community member well-known and respected for her work at preserving Secwepemc language and culture. In this video, she talks about the materials needed to build a summer home. The Secwepemc people were traditionally nomadic and moved through the land when gathering food or attending gatherings. A summer home could be quickly constructed and used for shelter along such travels.

Winter Homes

Summary - (Duration: 3m 08s, Size: 16.7Mb)

Dr. Mary Thomas was a Neskonlith community member well-known and respected for her work at preserving Secwepemc language and culture. In this video, she teaches people how to make moccasins. Before European contact, most clothing was produced from tanned animal hides.

Smoking Deer Meat

Summary - (Duration: 2m 25s, Size: 11.4Mb)

In this video, Adams Lake community members explain the process of smoking deer meat. Secwepemc people preserved deer meat this way before electricity was introduced to the community. In order to get ready for the long winter months, the gathering and preservation of food started in the Spring time and continued throughout the season to the Fall time.  

Summary - (Duration: 0m 45s, Size: 5.0Mb)

The 1910 Declaration is the first written document recording grievances concerning land issues from the Chiefs of the Secwepemc, Nlha7kapmx, and the Okanagan Nations. It was the Memorial to Sir Wilfred Laurier, which was presented to the federal Prime Minister of Canada on August 12, 1910 in Kamloops. The Memorial today is a cornerstone of the Secwepemc peoples’ struggle for their lands and their Aboriginal Rights.

Summary - (Duration: 4m 57s, Size: 24.2Mb)

Audrey Eugene, Shuswap community member, tells a story about the boundary line shared between the Secwepemc and Stoney people during the Secwepemc Storyteller Festival. The songs, dances, ceremonies, and stories of the Secwepemc people are a traditional part of daily life. This story follows a Secwepemc teaching about getting along with neighbouring tribes.